Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry book

Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry book

# 003280

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Item #: 003280
ISBN: 9780140384512
Grades: 5-10

Product Description:

Written from the viewpoint of a nine-year old black child in Mississippi in the depression-era of the 1930's, this book touches on the issues of prejudice, discrimination, and honor in the face of indignity. The young daughter of a sharecropper is determined to maintain her dignity as she faces the pressures and prejudices of the Depression Era in the South.

Category Description for COMPLETE PROGRAMS - LANGUAGE ARTS:

Language arts programs listed in this section cover most areas of language arts (reading/literature, writing, grammar, spelling and handwriting) in one curriculum, although some skill areas may be covered with less intensity than a focused, stand-alone course.




Category Description for STUDY GUIDES & BOOKS:

Please note that a brief synopsis of many of the books included here areprovided in our Library Builders section. Study guides for the samebook are often available from several publishers, so we found it more efficientto give a description of the book only once.




The set of all 12 literature units at each level are intended as a complete language arts curriculum teaching vocabulary, grammar, writing, spelling, story elements, and figurative language in the context of popular children's books. However, they are more than this, bordering on unit studies because of their strong social studies, science, critical thinking, and art/design components. Available at five levels (ages 7-9, 8-10, 9-11, 10-12 and 11-13), they correspond to concept units in the Moving Beyond the Page curriculum.

These use literature as a springboard for investigation, exploration, research, creativity and expression; the focus moves outward from the book. This is unlike most purely literature study guides which bring everything in toward a focus on the novel itself. Another unique attribute is the amount of creative expression involved, from identification with particular characters in the book to developing plotlines or stories having some common theme - there is much more running with a train of thought stimulated by the book than responding directly to the book. Motivated, artistic, imaginative, creative children will love all of the extension activities here! They will have many opportunities for creative expression as they write stories, draw and design things, use critical thinking skills, journal, reenact scenes, and mentally put themselves in the characters' shoes. Also striking is the rigorous nature of some of the assignments, especially at the lower levels. I can see why these are recommended for gifted students. Since these guides were originally created to enhance a science and social studies driven curriculum, there are many activities that get fairly deeply into these subject areas. This is especially the case in pre-reading activities as you set the stage for the time and location of the novel. The author utilizes these research opportunities to maximum advantage - and it does help to put the book in context. Often, this facet of literary analysis is skipped or passed over too lightly when we read a book, making it difficult to really understand some of the conflict, circumstance and social culture/customs that are critical to comprehension. While it's difficult to get a bead on the comprehensiveness of the guides for spelling, vocabulary, and grammar with only a small sampling, I can say with certainty that there's plenty of composition integrated into the units. Besides a large number of writing activities, the student keeps a journal which is used for some of the discussion question responses each day. In some guides, the journal is also used for other creative responses (such as retelling part of the story as diary entries through the eyes of Anna each day in Sarah, Plain and Tall). Other language arts areas seem to be covered in a solid, serious, and thorough manner, based on the samples I've reviewed. Vocabulary work is significant with children looking up words and writing definitions and using target words in compositions. Students learn how to use a dictionary and thesaurus to their advantage. Many activity pages are devoted to grammar, mechanics, and punctuation. Spelling lists, including common and challenge words, appear at the end of each guide.

Each literature unit is in a standard format. Lessons are structured and easy to use. There's no guesswork involved. Each one includes most of the following elements:

Questions to Explore - the Big Picture ideas and concepts for the lesson

Facts and Definitions - any knowledge or vocabulary learned during the lesson

Skills - objectives, identified by subject area

Materials - everything needed for the lesson, even included activity pages

Introduction - exactly how to introduce the lesson to your child (almost scripted)

Activities - generally from 1-4 of these which vary widely by lesson

Conclusion - summing up the ideas from the lesson along with response from your child

Real-Life Application - an extension activity which takes a concept from the story and applies it to a real person or situation

While the format is standard, the lessons themselves are extremely varied. In one lesson, the concentration may be on a grammatical or literary aspect. The next, you may have a lot of social studies related activity. One lesson will have your child writing a persuasive paper; the next a poem. She may study prefixes and suffixes today and be baking cookies tomorrow! Today a science experiment; tomorrow planning a party! You get the idea. Moreover, there are often several options for an assignment, so you can choose the most appealing or beneficial one. If you are using these guides as the basis for a language arts program, you will probably want to leave most of those activities intact, but you may still want to moderate some of the writing assignments. And while the lessons are easy to use and complete, there is still a lot of parental involvement required. Some activities are challenging, others need adult help and guidance - which is not unusual at these grade levels. Lessons that include reading in the novel have a series of questions about the chapter(s). These are not all recall questions, but include more in-depth and subjective discussion questions. You should read the book in tandem with your child in order to assess her responses.

The number of lessons varies by guide. Some of the units include other books and resources (see below). Typically, a unit will last from 2-3 weeks, though you may take longer with some lessons, especially with some of the more involved activities. Every unit ends with a final project, some of which may take a few days to complete. There are three literature units for every concept per level. Using all three would allow your child to compare and contrast themes and characters across novels within a thematic framework. Literature units and novels also become more advanced through each level. Please note that this is not a religious curriculum. It does, however, encourage character development.

Concepts and units by age are listed below. Each literature package contains the literature unit guide AND the corresponding novel. Where other components are included, they appear below the package in italics. NOTE: Student Activity Page sets are NOT INCLUDED in the packages. A single copy of each is in the study guide. Although you are not allowed to reproduce these pages from the guides, they are all single-sided and usable, so you do not have to purchase a set of student pages unless you want to leave your guide intact.

Beginning with ages 9-11, the guides are "Student Directed Literature Units." All instruction is written directly to the student in a conversational tone and the guides are a worktext with no separate student activity pages. Each package contains the SDLU, the corresponding novel, and sometimes other books (listed below the package in italics). Occasional tests are provided with an answer key at the back of the unit. Also in the back are several references/helps: spelling lists, handy guides to writing and grammar, and a writing rubric.

The new guides for ages 12-14 are structured around two semesters, with five literature guides per semester. Publisher recommends the literature guides be completed in order. Each literature guide provides 12 lessons and a final project. In-depth analysis of story elements and figurative language, challenging essays and comprehensive grammar assignments will enable students to appreciate and emulate the craft of great writers. Thematically, guides will aid students in gaining a deeper understanding of everyday life in the past through the selected literature and reading assignments.




Category Description for Newbery Award Winners:



Category Description for UNIT STUDIES - CURRICULUM:

Unit Study Curriculums are "complete" curriculums based on the unit study approach that are intended to be used over a longer span of time (typically a year or more). They generally have an organized structure or flow and incorporate as many subject areas as possible. Typically, organizational materials and methods are provided along with some instruction for use. Broken into logical segments or "units" of study, they are intended to comprise the core of your curriculum.




Category Description for UNIT STUDIES:

What is a "unit study"? Briefly, it's a thematic or topical approach to teaching as opposed to the traditional by-subject approach. Rather than teach each subject separately, a unit study attempts to integrate many or all subject areas into a unified study - usually centered around a particular subject or event. Obviously History (the study of events) and Science (the study of "things") are well-suited to unit studies, and usually form the "core" around which other subjects are integrated. Subjects like Bible, Geography, Government, English (writing), and Reading/Literature, Music, Home Economics, Life Skills, and Art, are usually easy to integrate around a core topics. Remaining subjects (Math, Phonics, Grammar, Spelling) can be integrated to some extent via related activities. Each, however, has its own "system" (progression of skills, mastery of "rules") which must be followed to some degree. Since one of the additional advantages of a unit study curriculum is the ability to use it with students of varying ages and skill levels, these subjects are generally taught apart from the core curriculum. This may be as simple as assigning pages in a grammar or spelling book, or using a separate "program" for Phonics and Math. Unit studies also tend to be more activity-oriented than the traditional approach, a real boon to kinesthetic learners. Advocates of the unit study approach site studies showing that children learn best when learning is unified rather than fragmented and when learning is more participatory than passive.




Category Description for Discovering Literature Series:

These are excellent literature study guides which cultivate appreciation in literature, improve reading comprehension, and encourage development of insight. The guides are meant to be used by the teacher, although they contain student reproducibles. In the regular guides, chapter by chapter analysis includes student directives, chapter vocabulary and a chapter summary. Student directives are questions about the chapter that can either be used as discussion questions or as a guide for the student to use in developing his own summary. Vocabulary sections contain both word and description. The summary is intended for use by the teacher and gives pertinent details about each chapter. Many chapters are followed by a reproducible skills page which cover literary concepts such as character development, setting, elements of a narrative, plot development, etc. For example, in the guide to My Side of the Mountain, the flashback device is used in chapter one. So, following that chapter's analysis is a skill page on Flashback Development in which students learn about how the flashback is used effectively in the chapter. Other skill pages focus on other non-literary (but essential) skills such as outlining, sequencing, categorizing, comparison and contrast, etc. Another unique and appreciated feature is the incorporation of Writer's Forum pages. These are sprinkled throughout the guide and provide writing opportunities based on the novel. Some guides contain more of them than others: My Side of the Mountain includes three such pages which explore conflict, reality (vs. artistic "license") and a page which contains eight different writing suggestions to use for a culminating presentation. Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry has five such pages on a variety of topics including poetry, discrimination, and round vs. flat characters. Some of the guides also include a final, culminating project. Besides all of this, tests are included at the end of reading "blocks" (My Side has them every five chapters, Roll of Thunder has them every three). These include multiple choice, vocabulary and essay questions. Each book also contains a reproducible page to use for student summaries and chapter vocabulary plus answers for all skill pages and tests (including model essay answers). Challenging Level guides are formatted somewhat differently, with much more emphasis on reading strategies and analysis. Chapter by chapter discussion still centers on questions, vocabulary, and summary, but there are many more Strategy (the counterpart to the middle school level skill pages) and Writer's Forum pages. These are just excellent, exploring and examining many literary constructs and techniques. For example, in The Giver, while studying chapters 1 through 5, Strategies include: Beginning a Book, Setting and Mood, Irony, Plot - The Design of a Story, and Foreshadowing and Flashback. During this same span, three Writer's Forums are included: "Shades of Meaning," "Anecdote," and "A List of Rules." As with the lower level guides, testing occurs regularly at the end of specified chapter "blocks." Tests no longer include multiple choice answers, but concentrate on vocabulary and contain more essay (both short and long answer) topics. Again, answer pages in the back of the guide contain suggested responses for all student exercises and tests. While chapter summaries are usually sufficient for answering chapter questions in the regular level, the challenging level guides (thankfully) include answers to these questions also. These guides are well conceived and highly recommended.




Category Description for Novel Units Literature Guides:

If you're looking for a study guide for a specific book, Novel Units probably has it covered! They produce hundreds of literature guides - only a sampling of them are listed here. Teacher Guides are 30-40 pages - not voluminous, but enough for good coverage of the book. Format of the guides vary somewhat by grade level, but have some common elements. They begin with a synopsis of the book and its author and some pre-reading activities that serve both to provide background for the novel study and initiate student involvement and thinking about the story. Chapter by chapter (in some guides, multiple chapters) lesson plans contain vocabulary words, discussion questions (with answers), and suggested activities. Some guides also include writing ideas. Literature concepts/skills appear here and there. Some guides contain reproducible graphic organizers to aid student analysis. All include some culminating questions and activities. Again, these vary in scope and type by guide. There are no objective or essay tests, but each guide ends with a student assessment page that provides a list of projects or exercises to be completed to help evaluate student understanding. Student Packets (where available) are reproducible and, again, vary somewhat by grade level and book. In my sample packet, masters are provided for an initiating activity, a chapter-by-chapter study guide with questions and lines for answers, vocabulary activities, journal ideas, literary analysis, cross-curricular activities (art, drama, math), several graphic organizer / analysis pages, varied activity pages, comprehension quizzes, and a final test. Answers to all questions, worksheets, and test are included in the back, along with an essay evaluation form. Really, each of these components can function as a stand-alone product and can be used without the other, but for a more comprehensive study, they are best used in concert. There is very little overlap between the two, even in the chapter-by-chapter questions - but completing the questions in the Student Packet will help prepare your child for the more in-depth questions found in the Teacher Guide. If your child is working independently on a novel, the Student Packet can be used alone (if available). If you want to do little written work and put more emphasis on discussion, the Teacher Guide can be used by itself. As stated before, we have selected a sampling of guides at each grade level. If you like them, we'll add more!

Please note that some guides have been written to correlate with a specific edition of a book. Some of these editions are now out of print, and we do not carry all versions mentioned. Where multiple editions are available, such as Adventures of Tom Sawyer, the page numbers given in the guide may not correlate exactly.




Category Description for Christian Novel Studies Unit Studies:

If you like the unit study approach and you like the American history series by Peter Marshall and David Manuel, you will definitely want to check out this product. Chris Roe, author of study guides to accompany books in the Trailblazer series, has turned her attention to an American history-based unit study for the elementary grades. The America series consists of three books. Land of the Pilgrims' Pride (1492-1789) is based on The Light and the Glory for Children. From Every Mountainside (1787-1837) features From Sea to Shining Sea for Children. Let Freedom Ring (1837-1860) coincides with Sounding Forth the Trumpet for Children. Mrs. Roe selected this Marshall/Manuel series because of its easy-to-read format and its emphasis on our nation's history from a Christian perspective. Each book is an 11-week unit study, so using all three would amount to a school year's worth of study. Besides American history, the unit studies incorporate lessons for reading/vocabulary, Bible, English grammar and writing, science, geography, health, music and art. (As with most unit studies, a separate math curriculum must be used.) In addition to the Marshall/Manuel books, five or six other books are read with each unit study. Most would be available at the library, and we are offering them as well. Required books for grades 3 and 4 are sometimes different than the ones needed for grades 5 and 6. Suggestions for more good reading material are also provided. In addition, Mrs. Roe has included a list of books recommended for 1st and 2nd graders if you are trying to stretch the study to include younger students. Each student must also have a spiral-bound notebook for writing his daily assignments. In English, grammar cards will be made by the student, or purchased separately. Mrs. Roe's personal experience as a homeschool teacher shows through in a couple of ways. Each week's section begins with a supply list of all that you will need that week. As much as possible, common household items have been used, but items that you may need to pick up at the store are listed in bold print. "Notes to the teacher" are sprinkled throughout and are shaded in gray so that you may easily scan for these to ease your preparation for the lessons. Two science lessons begin each week's lessons. These are designed so that you can do science either two or four days per week. The remainder of the week's study is broken down into day-by-day lesson plans. The lesson for each subject is laid out. Therefore, if you like the order that the subjects are listed in, you can go right down the pages for each day's lessons. Lessons include some background information, discussion questions, and activities. Although you can "wing it", you would be well advised to look through the questions and activities beforehand, adding to or modifying as you see fit. The first 10 weeks of each study are laid out in similar fashion, with the 11th week designed for wrap-up discussion and activities. An answer key to the discussion questions and other helpful teaching information is included in the back of the book.




Category Description for Guides for Ages 10-12:

A set of Literature Units (LU) is a complete language arts curriculum teaching vocabulary, grammar, composition, spelling, story elements, and figurative language in the context of popular children's books. LUs each explore one facet of a concept that ties three units together. Each unit has a primary book that is studied for 2-3 weeks and may include additional


Primary Subject
Reading/Literature
Grade Start
5
Grade End
10
ISBN
9780140384512
Binding
Trade Paper
Pages
288
Edition
Anniversary, Illustrated
Language
English
Ages
10 to 13
Audience
Juvenile
Awards
Newbery Medal ( WON AWARD ) 1977 ; Boston Globe-Horn Book Awards ( NOMINATED FOR AN AWARD ) 1977 ; Young Reader's Choice Award (
Author
Mildred D. Taylor
Format
Softcover Book
Brand Name
Viking
Weight
0.5 (lbs.)
Dimensions
7.75" x 5.25" x 0.75"
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Wilson Hill Academy course required
Karen R on May 17, 2017
Wilson Hill Academy course required
Karen R on May 17, 2017
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beautiful writing, intense and important story
This is a wonderful novel. Not only is the story gripping, but the writing is full of imagery, figurative language, and subtle humor. The story is intense, but the characters keep up hope throughout. This is one of those refreshing children's book where adults are portrayed not as clueless but as wise mentors; Cassie's close relationships with her parents, grandmother, and an older family friend are beautifully depicted. Note: While the description here says the book is about the daughter of a sharecropper, this is untrue. The central premise of the story is that the family are NOT sharecroppers, and this is what makes them different from others in their community. They own their own land and are striving to keep it despite all odds.
April 25, 2017

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