Jotham's Journey: A Storybook for Advent

Jotham's Journey: A Storybook for Advent

# 044626

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Item #: 044626
ISBN: 9780825441745
Grades: K-AD

Product Description:

Beginning the fourth Sunday before Christmas, many families set aside a few minutes a day to celebrate Advent and zero in on the true reason for the season. This wonderful story is designed to be used during Advent but really could just be read and enjoyed like a typical book. For each day of Advent, the book provides a short chapter of a story about a young boy whose family were shepherds during the time of Jesus' birth. Due to Jotham's poor attitude and a misunderstanding, Jotham is separated from his family and must travel across Israel in search of them. He faces many dangers but also meets many new friends. Ultimately, Jotham is reunited with his family on Christmas Eve, just in time for them all to witness the birth of Christ together. It's a charming tale, full of adventure and lessons, and is ideal for the whole family to read aloud. Each chapter probably takes about 10-15 minutes to read and usually concludes with a scripture verse that ties in with the story as well as a small, 1-2 paragraph devotional. Whether you use it to celebrate Advent in the traditional way or just read it for fun, this story is entertaining and a great reminder of what Christmas is really all about. By Arnold Ytreeide, 168 pgs, pb. ~ Rachel

Primary Subject
Bible
Grade Start
K
Grade End
AD
ISBN
9780825441745
Author
Arnold Ytreeide
Format
Softcover Book
Brand Name
Kregel
Weight
0.9 (lbs.)
Dimensions
9.25" x 8.5" x 0.5"
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Why did you choose this?
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I heard a home schooling mother on Catholic radio today say that she reads this book at Advent with her children. I would like to read it to see if it is that good so that I can share it with others.
Marian P on Nov 27, 2018
The series was recommended by a friend.
Tracy J on Nov 27, 2016
I heard a home schooling mother on Catholic radio today say that she reads this book at Advent with her children. I would like to read it to see if it is that good so that I can share it with others.
Marian P on Nov 27, 2018
We read Tabitha's Travels this year. The family loved it, so I purchased this for next Christmas.
Otonya on Jan 4, 2017
The series was recommended by a friend.
Tracy J on Nov 27, 2016
I ordered these for my grandblessings. I read this book to my children and they loved it! They begged me to read more each night. It's a story that young and old will like.
Mary B on Nov 19, 2016
We read another book in this series last year during advent and enjoyed it much.
Aaron C on Nov 1, 2016
looking for a good family advent read aloud
kelly w on Aug 13, 2016
Friend recommended for Advent Devos
Brenda M on Dec 2, 2015
recommended by a friend and Amazon was sold out
Naomi E on Dec 2, 2015
For our advent reading.....a blogger recommended it to me.
Stephanie N on Nov 29, 2015
We read Tabitha's Travels this year. The family loved it, so I purchased this for next Christmas.
Otonya on Jan 4, 2017
I ordered these for my grandblessings. I read this book to my children and they loved it! They begged me to read more each night. It's a story that young and old will like.
Mary B on Nov 19, 2016
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Rated 1 out of 5
Starts strong, but best to avoid this one
We were excited to read Jotham's Journey as we prepared for celebrating the coming of Jesus. The first lessons were very meaningful and helpful. They had a hint of danger in them, but it was something we could talk through with our children. However, the intensity of the danger, particularly with the introduction of a super-villain named Decha, has made this inappropriate for our children. Over time, the scripture meditation has become shorter, sometimes missing an actual Bible reference, and the story has become increasingly violent. It's too scary for our little ones, and by the end, the birth of Messiah is an afterthought to the reoccurring conflict between this evil man and a beleaguered little boy. It also becomes so extreme as to be completely unbelievable.

I'm disappointed and dismayed by the content. As we're only halfway through the book now, I'm wondering what we ought to do about the rest of advent, and if I can, with extreme editing, finish up the story this week so we can focus on Jesus more fully by doing something else. I feel like the violence directed towards this boy and those who help him moves from extremely harsh to sensational and gratuitous. For example, one of the later confrontations happens in a tomb, and the weapon of defense is a human femur. This scene takes place some readings after a description of evil henchmen's bodies being lined up next to a pyre with blood oozing out of their chests. It's marketed as family reading. My family includes a five year old. This is not family reading. If it were a screenplay, it'd be R-rated. It's just so unnecessary.

The post-story meditation we read this evening was incredibly poor. Here's a direct quote: "Jotham is lucky that Nathan is not selfish and unforgiving. We are lucky that God is not selfish and unforgiving. Can we act towards others as God has acted towards us?" Number one: Luck has nothing to do with anything related to God. It's a ridiculous statement. We are not lucky at all. The character of God is more consistently perfect and beautiful than the sunrise. He is eternally good. Luck does not figure into the equation of his grace and justice towards us. Number two: In the context of this chapter, selfishness and unforgiveness have no part in the action. Jotham is victim of kidnapping and his friend Nathan has survived unexpectedly and rescues him. He has no reason to forgive Jotham because Jotham has not wronged him. Nathan saves him, which is selfless, but more importantly shows righteous and moral behavior. He's doing what a righteous man ought to do. It's nothing to do with avoiding selfishness or unforgiveness. Sure, we should be selfless and forgiving-- but the answer to the above question is no- we can't. We can't act like God. We can't do this-- unless the Spirit of God is within us, transforming our hearts from stone to flesh.
I can't recommend this one. Find something else that puts you back into the Bible. The True Story is the best one to prepare a heart for the coming Savior.
December 13, 2021


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